Stromboli QTVR

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Spring day on Stromboli: In addition to the profusion of flowers (yellow Chrysanthemum coronarium in the foreground), imagine the sound of countless insects as well as the scents from flowers, herbs, trees and, occasionally, even the volcano!
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On a lava flow reaching out into the deep blue Tyrrhenian Sea, just in front of Hotel Villaggio Stromboli.
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Many of the houses in Piscità are built on basaltic lava flows, which were erupted by Stromboli some 14’000 to 5'600 years ago. Around the houses we see many purple flowers of Lavatera cretica.
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Lava flows at Piscità, erupted by Stromboli some 14’000 to 5'600 years ago, caused the formation of the small narrow coves formerly favoured by fishermen and, today, by people who enjoy swimming in the clear blue waters of the Mediterranean.
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Autumn sunrise on the coast below San Vincenzo. Large amounts of gravel were deposited in this coastal area where the sea is relatively shallow between Strombolicchio and Stromboli, creating the longest pebbly beach on the island. Between this coast and Strombolicchio there is a shallow submarine plattform created by abrasion.
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While fishing was a major source of food and income for the people of Stromboli in the 19th and early 20th century, all but one family remains who still follows this tradition to this day. Stromboli volcano looks dark and threatening on this rainy autumn day.
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When the panorama opens you first see a traditionally woven trap for fish and crabs, a so-called Nassa, in the foreground. Turning to the left you find green, modern equivalents. Most of the beautifully painted fishing boats are stored onshore at Scari for the lack of a natural port in Stromboli village.
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View from the terrace in front of the church of San Vincenzo across to Strombolicchio. To the right of Strombolicchio the Italian mainland is just barely visible below the chain of cumulus clouds near the horizon. Further on the right, Stromboli's steam plume can be seen drifting away towards the East.
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Lava boulders polished by wave action south of Scari: Boulders which have tumbled too near to the water experience considerable abrasion by pebbles thrown around by surf, in particular during winter storms.
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Typical honeycomb weathering in basaltic rocks along the coast south of Scari.
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Another example of honeycomb weathering in basaltic rocks along the coast south of Scari.
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Spring vegetation at la Petrazza: Pale purple Galactites Tomentosa the flowers in the foreground are Opuntia ficus-indica, Genista thyrrena, Euphorbia dendroides and Artemisia arborescens.
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Strombolicchio's top was flattened when the lighthouse was built. From this platform we enjoy the spectacular view past the «horsehead», a prominent rock which is also well visible from the main island. Nestled on the lower left of the «horse» is a small opuntia (ficus-indica).
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We stand on Strombolicchio's west side, about 60 meters above sea level and look across to Stromboli on a calm autumn day when the volcano’s steam rises almost vertically from the crater terrace towards the cloudless sky. Towards the right is a crane and which used during the construction of the lighthouse of Strombolicchio.
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Along the path from Piscità to Labronzo: Ginestra thyrrena, Euphorbia dendroides, Artemisia arborescens (silvery, tall plants; strong pleasant scent; the web page unfortunately will not convey this...), Chrysanthemum coronarium (yellow flowers), Matthiola rupestris (purple flowers), Convolvolus althaeoides (pink flowers).
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A serene location along the path which winds up towards Labronzo invites to rest, to meditate or to enjoy the view which includes the last houses of Piscità and the black basaltic lava flows on which they have been built as well as Strombolicchio in the distance.
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On the terrace of Labronzo giant fennel plants (Ferula Communis) and yellow «ginestre» bushes (Ginestra Thyrrena) have invaded terrain which was formerly used for farming. In addition masses of reeds (Saccharum aegyptiacum), formerly used to protect the Malvasia wineyards from the wind, have spred all over the northeastern flank of the volcano since the big eruption of 1930.
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Near the end of the paved path (where Cristina Bonafini, Jürg’s goddaughter is waiting) at about 270 meters above sea level. A powerful Scirocco storm, blows the smoke from the craters down over the Sciara del fuoco all the way to the sea and away towards the northwest. Compare the panorama taken on the same day, from Pizzo.
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On the path from Ginostra on our way towards the summits of Stromboli. The view is towards the other Eolian Islands, from left to right: Vulcano (barely visible, behind a layer of haze), Basiluzzo and Panarea (smaller and larger islands sloping steeply towards the right and more gradually towards the left), Lipari (behind Panarea), Salina (twin volcanic cones) and, again just barely visible, Filicudi.
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Here the path from Ginostra enters the Vancori caldera and the view opens to the recent Stromboli crater cones. Note the prominent pale reddish dike leading up towards the steaming southwest crater. Turning to the right the Vancori become visible, which form the highest point on Stromboli.
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Is this the most spectacular spot on Stromboli? Standing on the western end of the Vancori ridge, the ancient rim of the Vancori caldera (note layers of pyroclastics sloping away from Stromboli's centre), we look across to the recent edifice of Stromboli. Far down, to the left of the sun glistening on the sea, some houses of Ginostra can be glimpsed.
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On the ridge southwest of Pizzo. Note the cross-bedded ash layers in the yellow cliff, to the right of the black craters. Cristina Bonafini, Jürg’s goddaughter, and Pamela Alean are relaxing after the strenuous climb during Scirocco conditions and are waiting for the evening fireworks.
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This panorama taken on Pizzo during a veritable Scirocco storm, shows a remarkable phenomenon to the right of the crater terrace: Smoke from the craters cannot rise due to the power of the wind. Instead it gets blown down the Sciara del fuoco (not visible, behind the craters) all the way to the sea. Then it drifts away right on the sea surface.
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Ginostra lays claim to a world record, i.e. the smallest harbour. Indeed a minute entrance allows only small fishing boats into a basin barely a few metres wide from which the vessels have to be hauled up onto a paved slope in order to make room for others.
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Palms, fig trees, (yellow flowers), bougainvillia, oleander, (green tree left off ugly brown house, complicated, finely structures leaves) – the sights and smells of spring in Ginostra! Behind the church (marked by the red bougainvillia) are, from left to right: Basiluzzo and Panarea, Lipari (behind Panarea) and Salina (twin volcano).